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't want to make it worse. the u.n. has said, the u.s. secretary joe has said the introduction o of more weapons industry is adequate counterproductive or not will lead to a resolution for special representative brahimi called for renewed diplomatic initiative bring the warring party to negotiating table. can the prime minister set out what steps you a cake government is taking to support the u.n. and advancing this initiative? >> we are taking specific steps to help the u.n. with his initiative and try to achieve a diplomatic solution would transition at the top of the regime is worthwhile pursuing. that is why we have detailed talks with the russian foreign and defense ministers in the last week. i would just make one of the point about the issue of the arms embargo, because i felt sitting about the european council chamber there was a slight similarity between some of the arguments that were being made about not putting more weapons into syria that seem to be very familiar to the discussions we had about bosnia and the appalling events that followed. and in my view it is better to be
everything in the press that has been written, and they feel that the november trip to the u.n. was so successful that they are willing to go to the icc. when you say that israel may build this bottleneck area linking north and south, they say, fine. the more palestinians you talk to who believe that it is either final status or bust, and buss means the u.n., and not interested in any sort of coordinated unilateral agreement, it is a dirty word there, you are really seeing confidence. i personally hope the president in his stay over there is able to talk to the president over there and speak to them about the limitations of that strategy two could go to the icc. israelis say they're going to the icc. that could tie them up for years in legal proceedings. i do not see how any of this brings peace. i'm concerned about it. i'm also concerned about decision making, i'm concerned about the isolation of prime minister fayyat. the palestinian press does not report on his activities anymore. on the one hand, the good news is that more money has arrived lately. since obama is coming, of course
specifically? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. the constructed in many ways. physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. after 10 years of war in iraq we find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john kerry's visit today, the tensions between the united states and this government, not very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. i would say that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of meetings over flights. iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. guest: a whole concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to t
is a suspect to embargo. -- is subject to u.n. embargo. there is so much at stake here, if you could -- what specific leverage might the united states employed in those direct discussions that are taking place with the iraqis? intodo not want to go great detail here about our discussions with iraqis. we have discussed the united states resolution with the iraqis. in a sense, in the end, what matters is the government of iraq understand that its own interests will be best served not by facilitating the iranian efforts to prolong the crisis in syria, but rather in bringing about a transitional government that will have good relations with the government in iraq. >> understanding by the iraqi government would be helpful. action by the iraqi government would be necessary to ensure this takes place. i would like to focus on two types of aid. one is military. there is a difference of opinion here on capitol hill. about whether or not provide direct military assistance to the opposition. the argument is made that it is really hard to know where these weapons are going, that they might wind up in th
? guest: i spent five years in iraq as the u.n. spokesman, i got to know it intimately. let me tell you that iraq is a pretty much destroyed country. in many ways.d physically and otherwise. there is no reconciliation. war in iraq weof find that the country is more divided than ever. as we have seen from john they's visit today, tensions between the united , nots and this government very cordial. imbued with a lot of tension. a lot coming back from the community of nations they have not really a implemented. that it is all because of a constitution that failed the entire public at large. basically taking segments of society and addressing themselves to them. host: this unannounced trip that you just indicated in iraq, these officials with the president on his trip, the associated press pointed out that there were a series of .eetings over flights iran says that this is humanitarian aid and that syria is getting the weapons or else. concern, as the israelis feel that regardless of everything going on, they look to the north and in syria they see it disintegrating. weapons are flowing int
to go down the u.n. road, the route of moving and international organizations, that is not road that will lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i did not mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria, but there will be private discussions on syria in israel. there'll be a private discussion with palestinians on israel as well. you have four hundred thousand palestinians in syria who are in a very vulnerable position. imagine that that is not currently part of a private conversation. sure, there'll be a focus on peace, but there will also be a focus on this. what are we doing to safeguard the palestinians that are there? goingordan, you're also to have a public and private pension. englander sends a signal of interest, which it is important, but the private pension has to focus on syria as well. you have four hundred thousand assyrian refugees in jordan today. 100,000 additional since the beginning of this year. if that pace continues, you could have 700,000 by june. the impact on jordan is actually very hard to cont
, decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq and those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. who blame the people committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. insurgencies just that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. -- been closed. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
? some syrian rebels have been designated as foreign terrorist organizations. they have captured u.n. peacekeepers after being released later. the u.s. must take necessary precautions and due diligence. can you give us more information about the opposition? they are not just syrian national. who are far and fighters have the islamic militants from neighboring countries. post-asidevern in a syria? on weapons of mass destruction, are reports correct the syrian regime might possess up to 50 tons of weapons-grade nuclear materials in its stockpile? true, willports are the u.s. call for an emergency meeting to discuss this and if assad does not grant inspectors immediate access to all nuclear facilities and stockpiles so they can be protected, will the u.s. impose and mediate, comprehensive, and painful sanctions? will we do sell acting with the european union? lastly, on the countries that are aiding the brutality of regime, these countries continue to provide military assistance, weaponry, and they seek to further the illegal weapons program in supporting these foreign terrorist organiz
and humanitarian missions since the u.n. was founded. of the well aware troubles in ireland over a 30- year time and how painful that was and how it affected life on our island brutally, tragically, and involved an enormous scale of response from some many people. many people. the hatred and loss was written over our timely -- tiny island. democracy and the region and the pursuit of democratic ideals, they were part of peace. the united states and america played its part in that area -- in that. america, in its pursuit of democracy, united us in so many ways. thatall being in this city in 1996 when the clinton administration called meetings from a business and political point of view. i remember senator george mitchell speaking about democracy. i remember him recalling his own family's involvement because of immigration from ireland in economic circumstances, that this country gave him the democratic opportunity to serve as senate leader for 20 years. he was followed at that meeting by ron brown, who tragically lost his life in a plane crash sometime later. george about democracy, mitchell point
weapons. there are measures we have called for, and we know the u.n. is moving forward with investigations on exactly what happened. i have said publicly that the use of chemical weapons by the assad regime would be a game changer from our perspective. because, once you let that's the situation spend out of control, it is very hard to stop and that will have enormous spillover effects across the region. and so, we are going to continue to closely consult with everybody across the region and do everything we can to break -- bring an end to the bloodshed and to allow the syrian people to get out from under a leader who was lost all legitimacy because he is willing to slaughter his own people. he will be replaced. it is not a question of if. it is when. part of what we have to think about is what is the aftermath going to affect? and by the way, we need to think about that in a way that serves the syrian people from all walks of life, from all religious affiliations. because one of the things we know about this region is that if we fail the -- to create a model in the arab world in which peop
involvement, there would have to be a u.n. security council resolution regional agreement and an agreement among the 28 patients. so within nato, what we are focused on is defending now with syria. and we would move patriot missiles down to do that. in terms of what else is happening in an individual nation by nation basis, there is a great deal of discussion of everything you mentioned, no-fly zones, arms embargoes, etc. it is moving individually, but it has not yet come into nato as an overall nato type of approach. it is focused, planning, being prepared. but the movement at the moment is in the individual national way. >> does that include some countries that are thinking about the possibility of going after at least some of serious air defense? >> yes. >> thank you. >> senator? >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> i want to get some clarification. i am disturbed about the answers that you just gave. i know that general jacoby, that would've been better asked. however, you are responsible for the homeland. when we talk about the capability of iran, we talk about both western europe and the
, the decision to invade kuwait then the u.n. sanctions that follow that in the effect it had on iraqi society made it all the more difficult for that society to move toward stability in the wake of the saddam hussein regime. i would blame al qaeda and iraq nd those who used masss murder as a principal tactic in the war. i would ask dr. zbigniew brzezinski to visit the cities in iraq that were rocked by these murderous attacks and ask them who they blame. hey blame the people who committed those murders. in 2005 when we went to a city where life was choked out of it because of a systematic attack by al qaeda, they turned that city into their training base. it is with a connected sniper training, medical training. these are not just insurgencies that happened because people to not like america. these are organizations that mobilize resources and people. this is an enemy organization. courses offer their included kidnapping and murder. they choked the life out of the city. schools have been closed for over a year. marketplaces have a cold. communities have fallen in on themselves -- marketplaces
are still required to pay taxes. n, one thing that is important to note is your u.s. citizen children, they are eligible for certain benefits because they are u.s. citizens. although you are not, it is important for you to know there are resources out there to support your children depending on what their needs are. i think he also raises an important question which is, what are the requirements people will have to go through in order to apply for some kind of earned citizenship. one thing considered is definitely there will be a panel become a pretty hefty penalty. second, people will have to pay fees for that application. the program will most likely have to be self sustaining. third, both the senate and house will be considering back taxes for people who may be did not pay taxes. finally, a requirement that people speak english or demonstrate an ability to speak english. that is one piece that is not known exactly yet in terms of -- will people have to pass a test, well then have to show they are enrolled in school, etc.? that is one potential area for people m people martin who do
. my question dovetails with jo n's question. based on your withdrawal from iraq, afghanistan, pivot to asia, is the u.s. committed to the gulf region and the middle east in general? if you could elaborate a little more on the general commitment in the region, and if the answer is yes, how can we find more ways to demonstrate that commitment? >> the answer is yes, and expanded answer to that would indeed be how can we find ways to demonstrate our commitment differently. this notion of withdrawing from iraq and afghanistan, as somehow indicative of less commitment to the region, i really would like to react to that. andent three years in iraq, what you have to say -- and we are all aware that tomorrow is the 10-year anniversary and the debate goes on about whether we should have, whether it was worth it, and that debate will go on. even if it is in this room, we all decide that we have a common answer to that question, it will go on, and its shadow on, and we should always be introspective about the things we do. my personal belief is that having given iraq and opportunity -- first of
to be a very exciting moment to put something together that we couldn't have thought of. >> more with n.i.h. director dr. francis collins, sunday night at :00 on c-span's "q&a." off the floor of the u.s. senate report that democrats are dropping the assault weapons ban from their gun bill, making the approval of the bill -- ban unlikely. the c.q. congressional quarterly reports that senator dianne feinstein of california all but conceded today that the assault weapons banshee has spent months urging congress to renew will not become law. saying quote i very much regret it, i tried my best, but i guess my best wasn't good enough she told reporters before going to the weekly party lunches with senate democrats. on the senate side they'll being back this afternoon at 2:15. we expect the house to be back about the same time. until thin a conversation on female senators in the senate armed services committee and their impact on military polcy. -- policy. host: staff writer for "roll call" newspaper in washington. women changing the face of senate armed services panel. how so? guest: in the a
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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